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Sunday, July 19, 2020 | History

5 edition of The mythology of South America found in the catalog.

The mythology of South America

John Bierhorst

The mythology of South America

by John Bierhorst

  • 281 Want to read
  • 33 Currently reading

Published by Quill/W. Morrow in New York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Indians of South America -- Religion.,
  • Indian mythology -- South America.

  • About the Edition

    Discusses the mythology from Indians of various regions of South America, describing origins, comparing the similar tales, and presenting some of the myths themselves.

    Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references (p. 255-263) and index.

    StatementJohn Bierhorst.
    SeriesGods and heroes of the New World
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxi, 269 p. :
    Number of Pages269
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL22959893M
    ISBN 100688107397

    Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for The Mythology of South America by John Bierhorst (, Hardcover) at the best online prices at eBay! Free shipping for many products!   "Originally published as North American Indian Mythology, Cottie Burland, , Mexican and Central American Mythology, Irene Nicholson, , South American Mythology, Harold Osborne, ". Includes bibliographical references (p. ) and index 6Pages:

    Through engaging narration and colorful illustrations, this book helps children explore the rich mythologies and legends of the many cultures of the peoples of South and Southeast Asia. World Book's series Famous Myths and Legends of the World collects many famous stories from around the world. The stories are written in a creative way to Price: $   The Carau. The carau (Aramus guarauna), is a bird found in the wetlands of Argentina and other countries in the Americas. It is also known as the crying bird, limpkin, carrao or courlan and is looks like a cross between a crane and a rail. From the northeastern part of Argentina comes a legend about its origin which also warns about the dangers of disrespecting one’s mother.

    South America is the fourth largest continent on Earth. Before Europeans discovered it, South America was the home of many ancient civilizations numbering millions of people. The collection of folktales from South America consists of two books with thirty Brazilian folktales. Notes: Subtitled "How and why tales from Brazilian folk-lore", this.   Buy The Mythology of South America New Ed by Bierhorst, John (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible orders.5/5(1).


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The mythology of South America by John Bierhorst Download PDF EPUB FB2

As such, the book provides a good, accessible overview of the mythology of a very large and diverse area. After dividing South America up into 7 regions, the author discusses the prominent types of myths/legends, and briefly gives important or interesting examples from specific tribes/5.

More than any other continent, South America "has preserved the conditions that allow mythology to be freely produced." Dividing the continent into seven carefully mapped regions, John Bierhorst shows how South America's principal myths can be traced from tribe to tribe and how each region has developed its own unique oral tradition.5/5(1).

3 Mythologies by time period. Late Antiquity. 4 Fictional mythologies. Mythologies by region. Greater Middle East. Main article: Middle Eastern mythology (disambiguation) Further information: Religions of the ancient Near East. Abrahamic mythology.

Christian mythology. Islamic mythology. Jewish mythology. Elamite mythology. Hittite mythology. All Book Search results » About the author () John Bierhorst's many books on Latin American folklore & mythology include "The Mythology of South America", "The Mythology of Norther America" & "The Mythology of Mexico & Central America".

A specialist in the language & literature of the Aztecs, he is the author of a Nahuatal-English. Get this from a library. The mythology of South America.

[John Bierhorst] -- Discusses the mythology from Indians of various regions of South America, describing origins, comparing the similar tales, and presenting some of the myths themselves. More than any other continent, South America "has preserved the conditions that allow mythology to be freely produced." Dividing the continent into seven carefully mapped regions, John Bierhorst shows how South America's principal myths can be traced from tribe to tribe and how each region has developed its own unique oral : $ Latin American Folklore & Mythology: Books.

1 - 20 of 27 results. Grid View Grid. List View List. Add to Wishlist. Quickview. Day of the Dead. by Flame Tree Publishing.

Hardcover $ $ Current price is $, Original price Publish your book with B&N. Learn More. Central American folklore, Reptile folklore, South American folklore Huayramama She has no direct biological counterpart, but is believed to be an enormous boa with an old woman’s face and very long hair that tangles in the clouds – in comparison, her counterparts the Sachamama and the Yakumama are the boa constrictor and the anaconda.

John Bierhorst's many books on Latin American folklore & mythology include "The Mythology of South America", "The Mythology of Norther America" & "The Mythology of Mexico & Central America".

A specialist in the language & literature of the Aztecs, he is the author of a Nahuatal-English dictionary & the translator of Cantares Mexicanos.

As such, the book provides a good, accessible overview of the mythology of a very large and diverse area. After dividing South America up into 7 regions, the author discusses the prominent types of myths/legends, and briefly gives important or interesting examples from specific tribes/5(2).

This lesson will explore the major gods and goddesses of the Inca culture, which was the primary mythical tradition in South America, spanning the Andes, Bolivia, Chile, Columbia, and Peru. This book was a huge eye opener for me.

Even though this says The Mythology of North America, it extends well beyond North America, tells myths, legends, & real facts about expeditions to Antarctica, Indian tribes I had never even heard of,animals that are extinct, some hunted almost to the brink of extention, that we've never even heard of/5(3).

The first appearance of the Mastopogon (“breast beard”), also called the Aegomastus, is as a nameless “strange fish” observed by Thevet off the coast of South America. It has a beard resembling a goat’s udder under its chin, and the illustration provided includes a long dorsal spine and pointed fins.

Discusses the mythology from Indians of various regions of South America, describing origins, comparing the similar tales, and presenting some of the myths themselves Greater Brazil -- Guiana -- Brazilian Highlands -- Gran Chaco -- Far South -- Northwest -- Central AndesPages: While laid out similarly to the South America book, The Mythology of mexico and central america is a coherent mythological region so instead of breaking the area into geographic regions with different myth types the book can instead focus on/5.

Mattievich wrote a book titled “Journey to the Mythological Inferno” inexploring connections between Greek myths and South American geographical and historical sites. The ancient Greek myth of Cadmus battling a snake could be an allegory for the discovery of the Amazon River, said Dr.

Enrico Mattievich, a retired professor of physics Author: Ancient-Origins. More than any other continent, South America has preserved the conditions that allow mythology to be freely produced. Dividing the continent into seven carefully mapped regions, John Bierhorst shows how South America's principal myths can be traced from tribe to tribe and how each region has developed its own unique oral tradition.

Introduction. South American mythology covers a vast and diverse area. We have already extracted the Inca civilization from the top end and given it its own section.

This leaves scattered tribes in Chile, Peru, Bolivia and Colombia where the El Dorado rumors started. Then we plunge through Brazil, down the Amazon and Xingu Rivers, until we reach the coast. More than any other continent, South America "has preserved the conditions that allow mythology to be freely produced." Dividing the continent into seven carefully mapped regions, John Bierhorst shows how South America's principal myths can be traced from tribe to tribe and how each region has developed its own unique oral tradition.

Mar - The Mythology of South America with a new afterword by John Bierhorst - Oxford University Press Inc. Buy a cheap copy of The Mythology of North America book by John Bierhorst.

The growing economic and political influence of Native American tribes has brought religious issues, once little noted, increasingly to the fore. Timeless in their Free shipping over $/5(1). South America. Fairy Tales from Brazil How and Why Tales from Brazilian Folk-Lore (English) Eells, Elsie Spicer, Mixed Anthologies.

The Firelight Fairy Book (English) Beston, Henry; The Fairy Book; The Best Popular Stories Selected and .Description. More than any other continent, South America “has preserved the conditions that allow mythology to be freely produced.” Dividing the continent into seven carefully mapped regions, John Bierhorst shows how South America’s principal myths can be traced from tribe to tribe and how each region has developed its own unique oral tradition.